Creating Lasting Change

Elaine HolderElaine Holder first became familiar with Save the Children in 1973 when her children suggested they sponsor a child and that they would contribute some from their allowances. Her youngest daughter, Linda, was the one who bonded most with their first sponsored girl from Honduras. Elaine recalls, "They really got to know each other. They were close pen pals."

As the years went on, Elaine and her family added five additional sponsored children in countries where the need was greatest. Elaine says "I think Save the Children does a good job focusing on the long term development in the country which is what I liked best. In other words, they help residents of a particular community to support programs that will last. Teach a man to fish, right?"

Elaine recounts one of many reasons why she was drawn to Save the Children. "I remember hearing about this community that had plenty of protein because of a specific root growing in their village. Other areas in the region didn't have enough supply of this protein so Save the Children helped people who had protein-rich roots set up a factory to supply the product to other people who needed it."

While Elaine may be retired from her professional career as a Professor of Psychology at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, she is by no means retired from her work for Save the Children. Elaine states, "I think it's important to give back to the community. I don't have much, but what I do have I want to give to others who need help."

Elaine has extended her long commitment to Save the Children through planned giving. She says, "Save the Children is doing a good job at helping people take care of themselves by setting up long term programs instead of quick band-aid fixes."

Elaine grew up in Boulder, Colorado. She received a B.A. at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Master degree at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, and a Ph.D. at the University of Missouri, Columbia. She lost a believed son, Steven, in 2010, and she has three surviving children—Wayne, Elaine and Linda—four grandchildren-and three great—granddaughters.

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